Liturgy Office

Liturgy Office:

The Diocesan Liturgy Office is tasked by our bishop with implementing the vision of the Liturgy Constitution of the Second Vatican Council and all subsequent liturgical documents. To this end the Liturgy Office will provide formation, support and development to the liturgical life of our parishes, schools and institutions. We strive to promote further understanding in the areas of liturgical prayer, the sacraments, liturgical music and space, as well as to provide educational opportunities for the development of all liturgical ministers.

The Liturgy Office is also responsible for advising the bishop and our parishes on matters of Liturgical Art and Architecture – building, re-ordering, alterations and additions and artistic commissions – for all churches of the Diocese.

We are here to support individuals, parishes and communities in everything that enables them to be more fully a Church of deepened prayer – so if there’s anything that might support you and your parish in its celebration of the liturgy, please do get in touch.

The Bishop’s Conference of England and Wales Liturgy Office has prepared Prayers for use during a time of ‘flu and illness. This contains general prayers for health and also a note about Spiritual Communion and praying during Self-Isolation. You can access their page here.

Please see the latest newsletter below.

Postal Address:

Alexander House,
160 Pennywell Road,
Bristol
BS5 0TX

Our Diocesan Liturgy Office has now produced a series of videos, entitled A Call to Love to remind and encourage us of the importance of the Mass in our lives as Catholic Christians

Liturgy Office Chair:

Doreen Wyatt

Email: liturgy@cliftondiocese.com

Click on a link below for Liturgical information and resources:

Prayer of the Faithful

Prayer of the Faithful worksheet

Prayer of the Faithful – Arundel & Brighton guidelines

Cycle of Prayer – Model Intercessions

Year B – Advent/Christmastide

1st Sunday of Advent

2nd Sunday of Advent

Immaculate Conception of the BVM

3rd Sunday of Advent

4th Sunday of Advent

Christmas (midnight)

Christmas (day)

    Christmas Octave

Holy Family

Mother of God

2nd Sunday of Christmas

Epiphany

Baptism of the Lord

Presentation of the Lord

Year B Lent / Eastertide

Ash Wednesday

1st Sunday of Lent

2nd Sunday of Lent

3rd Sunday of Lent

4th Sunday of Lent

5th Sunday of Lent

Palm Sunday

Maundy Thursday

Good Friday 2021

Easter Vigil

Easter Day

2nd Sunday of Easter – Divine Mercy

3rd Sunday of Easter

4th Sunday of Easter

5th Sunday of Easter

6th Sunday of Easter

Ascension of the Lord

7th Sunday of Easter

Pentecost Sunday

Year B Ordinary Time

2nd Sunday Ordinary Time

3rd Sunday Ordinary Time

4th Sunday Ordinary Time

5th Sunday Ordinary Time

6th Sunday Ordinary Time

10th Sunday in Ordinary Time

11th Sunday in Ordinary Time

12th-Sunday-in-Ordinary-Time

13th Sunday in Ordinary Time

14th Sunday in Ordinary Time

15th Sunday in Ordinary Time

16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

17th Sunday in Ordinary Time

18th Sunday in Ordinary Time

19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

20th Sunday in Ordinary Time

21st Sunday in Ordinary Time

22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

25th Sunday in Ordinary Time

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

31st Sunday in Ordinary Time

32rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe

Other Solemnities and Feasts

Trinity Sunday

Corpus Christi

SS Peter & Paul

Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Solemnity of All Saints

Year A  Advent/Christmastide

1st Sunday of Advent

2nd Sunday of Advent

Immaculate Conception of the BVM

3rd Sunday of Advent

4th Sunday of Advent

Christmas (midnight)

Christmas (day)

Holy Family

Mother of God

2nd Sunday of Christmas

Epiphany

Baptism of the Lord

Presentation of the Lord

Year A Lent / Eastertide

Ash Wednesday

1st Sunday of Lent

2nd Sunday of Lent

3rd Sunday of Lent

4th Sunday of Lent

5th Sunday of Lent

Palm Sunday

Maundy Thursday

Easter Vigil

Easter Day

2nd Sunday of Easter (Divine Mercy Sunday)

3rd Sunday of Easter

4th Sunday of Easter

5th Sunday of Easter

6th Sunday of Easter

Ascension of the Lord

7th Sunday of Easter

Pentecost Sunday

Year A Ordinary Time

2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

4th Sunday in Ordinary Time

5th Sunday in Ordinary Time

6th Sunday in Ordinary Time

7th Sunday in Ordinary Time

11th Sunday in Ordinary Time

12th Sunday in Ordinary Time

13th Sunday in Ordinary Time

14th Sunday in Ordinary Time

15th Sunday in Ordinary Time

16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

17th Sunday in Ordinary Time

18th Sunday in Ordinary Time

19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

20th Sunday in Ordinary Time

21st Sunday in Ordinary Time

22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

25th Sunday in Ordinary Time

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

31st Sunday in Ordinary Time

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe

Other Solemnities and Feasts

Trinity Sunday

Corpus Christi

Solemnity of Ss Peter & Paul

Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Solemnity of All Saints

Transfiguration


Year C

Prayer of the Faithful

Prayer of the Faithful worksheet

Prayer of the Faithful – Arundel & Brighton guidelines

Cycle of Prayer – Model Intercessions

Year C  Advent/Christmastide

1st Sunday of Advent

2nd Sunday of Advent

Immaculate Conception of the BVM

3rd Sunday of Advent

4th Sunday of Advent

Christmas (midnight)

Christmas (day)

Holy Family

Mother of God

2nd Sunday of Christmas

Epiphany

Baptism of the Lord

Presentation of the Lord

Year C Lent / Eastertide

Ash Wednesday

1st Sunday of Lent

2nd Sunday of Lent 

3rd Sunday of Lent

4th Sunday of Lent

5th Sunday of Lent

Palm Sunday

Maundy Thursday

Easter Vigil

Easter Day

2nd Sunday of Easter (Divine Mercy Sunday)

3rd Sunday of Easter

4th Sunday of Easter

5th Sunday of Easter

6th Sunday of Easter

7th Sunday of Easter

Pentecost Sunday

Trinity Sunday

Year C Ordinary Time

2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

4th Sunday in Ordinary Time

5th Sunday in Ordinary Time

6th Sunday in Ordinary Time

7th Sunday in Ordinary Time

8th Sunday in Ordinary Time

13th Sunday in Ordinary Time 

14th Sunday in Ordinary Time

15th Sunday in Ordinary Time

16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

17th Sunday in Ordinary Time 

18th Sunday in Ordinary Time

19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

20th Sunday in ordinary Time

21st Sunday in Ordinary Time

22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

25th Sunday in Ordinary Time

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

31st Sunday in Ordinary Time

32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe

Other Solemnities and Feasts

Ascension of the Lord

Corpus Christi

SS Peter and Paul

Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Solemnity of All Saints

The following links are offered as a resource to all who are involved in liturgical ministry. The links given below were accurate at the time of going to print.

GENERAL LITURGY RESOURCES

www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/ccdds/index.htm

Congregation for Divine Worship and the discipline of the Sacraments (Vatican).

www.liturgyoffice.org.uk

The Department for Christian Life and Worship

of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales.

www.liturgytools.net

Offers a number of free to use hymns, prayers, pictures etc

LITURGY MAGAZINES

www.pastoralliturgy.org/

The Pastoral Liturgy Magazine

www.ocp.org/magazines

www.journalworship.org

Worship is an ecumenical journal devoted to the study of liturgical theology and practice.

www.musicasacra.com/journal/sacred-music/

Sacred Music is the official journal of the Church Music Association of America

LITURGY SOCIETIES

www.ssg.org.uk

The Society of Saint Gregory. Music and Liturgy Journal is produced by the society. A useful

resource for music planning.

www.liturgysociety.org

The Society for Catholic Liturgy is committed to promoting scholarly study and practical

renewal of the Church’s liturgy.

www.adoremus.org

Society for the Renewal of the Sacred Liturgy.

LITURGICAL FORMATION

www.catholic-resources.org

This website contains a variety of materials, mostly related to biblical and liturgical studies.

LITURGICAL PLANNING & MUSIC

www.communionantiphons.org/

This website features free, downloadable communion antiphons for all liturgical year cycles

to be used at Sunday and Holy Day Masses.

liturgy.slu.edu/

Centre for Liturgy at St Louis University. Excellent weekly resources including good

Universal Prayers (Prayer of the Faithful)

www.npm.org

National Association of Pastoral Musicians. Music for the Liturgy.

www.ccwatershed.org/chabanel

Responsorial Psalm settings for the liturgical year. The site includes free printable music for

organ and cantor and audio files. A Very useful for new cantors.

www.canticanova.com/index.html

Traditional music for the Contemporary Church. Planning, resources and hymns.

www.wellsprings.org.uk/wellsprings.htm

A good resource for the liturgical year: prayers, meditations. Good non-Eucharistic material.

LITURGY OF THE WORD

www.lectorprep.org

Help for those who proclaim the Word at Mass

www.bibleclaret.org/liturgy

Liturgy Alive. Good resources for the Mass including Prayer of the Faithful for each Sunday.

www.biblestudytools.com

Online study Bible with different translations and search

www.salfordliturgy.org.uk

An excellent resource from Salford Diocese including notes for readers for each Sunday of the year.

www.kairosforum.org/space/

A useful resource for helping people with intellectual challenges – includes downloadable files and resource guides

www.kairosforum.org/space/weekly-gospel/

A useful resource making the Sunday Gospel more accessible for people with intellectual challenges

CHILDREN’S LITURGY OF THE WORD

www.liturgyoffice.org.uk/Resources/LOWC/index.shtml

Guidelines and ministry leaflets for Masses and Liturgy of the Word with children

www.ocp.org/en-us/products/9595

Music for CLOW

LITURGY OF THE HOURS

www.universalis.com/today.htm

Mass Readings / Calendar/ Liturgy of the Hours -also phone app for hours. Grail translation

of psalms available together with some English diocesan calendars.

LATIN LITURGY

www.latin-liturgy.org.uk

Association for Latin liturgy

 

lms.org.uk

Latin Mass (Extraordinary Form)

 

Liturgy Office Newsletter – Spring 2024

Walking into church this week, you may see statues, crosses and images veiled in purple. The Roman Missal states (p280) that on the Fifth Sunday of Lent ’The practice of covering crosses and images throughout the church from Sunday may be observed, if the Conference of Bishops so decides. Crosses remain covered until the end of the celebration of the Lord’s Passion on Good Friday, but images remain covered until the beginning of the Easter Vigil.’

The practice of veiling images tells us that something is different, but the last two weeks of Lent are a time of immediate preparation for the celebration of the Sacred Triduum. The veils are hard to miss and they serve as a reminder to get ready!

The veils may seem out of place, ‘wrong’ somehow, and even counterintuitive, but these veiled images can build within us a hunger for Easter Sunday. It can seem strange that the crucifix is covered up during Passiontide; however, through this absence of images our senses are heightened and we become more aware of what is missing. Similarly, the absence of flowers on the altar and the suppression of the Alleluia during Lent effectively demonstrates that we are in exile from our true Home, where the angels sing Alleluia without ceasing.

This is the current practice of the Church, but veiling from the Fifth Sunday of Lent onward is minuscule compared to what was once practiced. For example, in Germany there was a tradition to veil the altar from view throughout all of Lent, but some authors say there was a practical reason for this insofar as the often-illiterate faithful needed a way to know it was Lent.

 So, if your parish follows the practice of covering images and statues in the last two weeks of Lent, (note that the Roman Missal says this may be observed, not must  or should be observed) you can rest assured that there is, in fact, a good reason for this; it is not simply an out-dated or old-fashioned practice – it is to help us journey more effectively to the great celebration of Easter.

 If we have failed to keep up our Lenten resolutions we shouldn’t despair, there is still time to pick them up again.  Whatever we decided, or failed, to do we can keep the three pillars of Prayer, Fasting and Almsgiving at the forefront of our minds for this last couple of weeks. And we shouldn’t do things that will only make us miserable; we can look on Lent as a gift as it gives us the opportunity to prepare fully to celebrate the Season of Easter.

Resignation of the Bishop of Clifton and appointment of a new Bishop

The Holy Father, Pope Francis, has accepted the resignation of the Right Reverend Declan Lang as Bishop of Clifton. Bishop Declan was ordained the ninth Bishop of Clifton on 28th March 2001 and has served the Diocese for 23 years as its bishop.

The Holy Father has appointed Rev. Canon Bosco MacDonald, a priest of the Diocese of Clifton, until now Dean of the Cathedral Church of St Peter and St Paul, Bristol, as the tenth Bishop of the Diocese of Clifton.

Until the Ordination of Bishop-elect Bosco, The Right Reverend Declan Lang will be the Apostolic Administrator of the Diocese – we keep them all in our prayers.

@Phil GibbonsBishop-Elect Bosco MacDonald said, on hearing the news of his appointment:

I am humbled that His Holiness Pope Francis has called me to become the 10th Bishop of the Diocese of Clifton, following the retirement of Bishop Declan Lang who has served us so lovingly and faithfully for 23 years, giving his life completely to the joys and hopes as well as the challenges of our Catholic communities here in the West of England.

As I embark on this new journey, I am filled with gratitude for the prayers and affection of so many wonderful priests and people, family and friends far and wide.

I am eager to renew my profession of faith and deepen my communion with the Successor of Peter and my brother Bishops. And just as Pope Francis encourages Bishops to be close to their people in a spirit of service, I accept this new role in obedience to my priestly call with a commitment to serve the priests and people of Clifton to the best of my ability, with care, tenderness, and compassion.

May the love of Christ and the intercession of Our Blessed Lady, Conceived Without Sin guide every step I take as the Bishop of this lovely Diocese of Clifton.

Bishop Declan Lang said:

I would like to congratulate Canon Bosco MacDonald and accompany him with my prayers on his appointment as the 10th Bishop of the Diocese of Clifton. He has many years of pastoral experience having worked in a number of parishes both as an assistant priest, parish priest and Dean of Clifton Cathedral. He brings much experience to his new ministry within the diocese which he will carry out with dedication and faithfulness.

I am sure he will also be a valuable member to the Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales as we discern the way forward in a changing society.

Please remember Canon Bosco in your prayers as he prepares for this new ministry.

The Episcopal Ordination of Bishop-Elect MacDonald will take place in the Cathedral Church of Saints Peter and Paul in Clifton, Bristol. The date will be announced in due course.

Chrism Mass

Our annual Chrism Mass, when Bishop Declan will bless the Oil of the Sick and the Oil of Catechumens and consecrate the Oil of Chrism – all of which will be used throughout the diocese in the coming year – will take place in our cathedral on Wednesday 27 March at 11am. This is a wonderful experience of the family of the diocese coming together to celebrate Mass just before we begin the Holy Paschal Triduum. If you have never taken part in this celebration before, do consider coming along. At this Mass, after the Liturgy of the Word, the three oils are brought forward to Bishop Declan who will bless the Oil of the Sick, which is pure olive oil, used for the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick, and the Oil of Catechumens, also pure olive oil which will be used pre-baptism for both adults and children. The Oil of Chrism, pure olive oil mixed with oil from the balsam plant is then consecrated. The the Oil of Chrism is used when young people are confirmed, and at the Easter Vigil when adults are confirmed after baptism.

Chrism oil is also part of the baptismal rite. Following an infant’s baptism with water and before he receives the white garment, the cross with chrism oil is traced on the crown of the child’s head, marking him as a Christian. Anointing on the head is also administered at the baptism of an adult if the person does not immediately receive the Sacrament of Confirmation.

Holy Chrism oil is used as well during the ordination of a priest (the Sacrament of Holy Orders) and the consecration of a bishop. It is the anointing used in the consecration of a church and the blessing of an altar and the vessels used at Mass.

Parish Liturgies of Reconciliation

Many parishes will have a Liturgy of Reconciliation during Lent, especially in these last two weeks, with the opportunity for individual confession. These can be a rich and rewarding experiences when we are helped to remember that we are not alone in our need to say sorry or find healing. We know that when we sin not only our relationship with God is damaged but it hurts others and the community. Preparing for the sacrament in the company of others, by reflecting on

readings, singing appropriate music and joining in prayer, strengthens us in our desire to meet God in our sorrow and vulnerability. The joy of unburdening ourselves allows us to continue on our journey to Easter so that when it comes we are ready and able to rejoice with Christ on Easter Sunday. You will find a couple of different examples of parish Reconciliation Services on the Liturgy Office website here and here. If you have not been to the Sacrament of Reconciliation for some time and have, perhaps, forgotten how to approach it or what to say, don’t worry – just explain this to the priest who will guide you through it. You will find a trifold explaining the Rite and what to say here

Sacred Paschal Triduum

The Catechism of the Catholic Church instructs us: “Beginning with the Easter Triduum as its source of light, the new age of the Resurrection fills the whole liturgical year with its brilliance.
Gradually, on either side of this source, the year is transfigured by the liturgy. It really is a “year of the Lord’s favour.” The economy of salvation is at work within the framework of time, but since its fulfilment in the Passover of Jesus and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, the culmination of history is anticipated “as a foretaste,” and the kingdom of God enters into our time. Therefore Easter is not simply one feast among others, but the “Feast of feasts,” the “Solemnity of solemnities,” just as the Eucharist is the “Sacrament of sacraments” (the Great Sacrament). St. Athanasius calls Easter “the Great Sunday” and the Eastern Churches call Holy Week “the Great Week.” The mystery of the Resurrection, in which Christ crushed death, permeates with its powerful energy our old time, until all is subjected to him.” (CCC #1168, 1169)

At the very heart of the Church’s year is the great Three days of the Sacred Triduum – Holy Thursday, Good Friday and the Resurrection of the Lord. Good liturgy is not simply a reenactment of something that happened over 2000 years ago but a real participation in the events themselves through living faith. The 40-day season of Lent with its practices of prayer, fasting and almsgiving should find us ready on Holy Thursday to enter into this short three-day season.

Lent itself quietly concludes on Holy Thursday, before we begin the evening Liturgy of the Lord’s Supper. This, together with the Friday Passion of the Lord (Good Friday) and the Easter Vigil during the night of Holy Saturday/Sunday, forms just one Liturgy – you will notice that there is no dismissal at the end of the Maundy Thursday Mass or the Good Friday Passion. By having only one name for all three days, the church focuses on something important – the fact that only one mystery is being celebrated: the Paschal Mystery. The three days are not separate liturgies. Rather it is one celebration extending over three days.

As we move into the Triduum, the passion is never separated from the full image of the death/resurrection event. It is always the glorious cross, the triumphant cross, the dying and the conquering death that we now know. This does not mean we neglect the suffering of Jesus or of the whole world. We simply embrace its mystery as best we can.

The Masses of Sunday morning begin the 50 days of rejoicing called Eastertime.

These seasons (Lent, the Triduum, and Eastertime) are about initiation and the sacraments involved (baptism, confirmation, Eucharist). Baptism is once-for-all in our Church. We do not prepare for re-baptism. Once we have entered those waters, whether as a child or adult, we never fully emerge from them. All of life is fulfilling those promises. Lent, Triduum, Eastertime only take us deeper into those waters.

Update on New Translation of the Lectionary

The New Translation of the Lectionary will, finally, be introduced this year, on the First Sunday of Advent, 1 December 2024.

The New Translation will consist of four volumes, not three, namely

    • Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts of the Lord
    • Weekdays I: Advent, Christmas, Lent, Easter, OT 1-9; Proper of Saints & Commons
    • Weekdays II: OT 6-34; Proper of Saints & Commons
    • Ritual Masses, VNO, Votive, Masses for the Dead

The scripture used will be English Standard Version – Catholic Edition and the Abbey Psalms and Canticles.

More news as we receive it.

…and finally - Art & Architecture

Please remember that the Liturgy Office is responsible for advising the bishop and our parishes on matters of liturgical Art and Architecture – building, re-ordering, alterations and additions and artistic commissions – for the churches of the diocese. The Department seeks to serve and help parishes and other communities to explore how they can make better use of their church buildings and chapels for the celebration of the Sacred Liturgy.

Any proposed changes which affect the liturgical and devotional life of the parish or community will need to be referred to the Liturgy Office for advice and permission where necessary. This may also require diocesan approval and possibly approval from the Historic Churches Committee (in the case of a listed building). For further information please see the Liturgical Diary, pages 157-158, or contact us at the Liturgy Office by email to liturgy@cliftondiocese.com or by telephoning 0117 902 5595.

 

                                                                           With best wishes for a very blessed and joyful Easter Season